Washington state sex offender data base

Why sex offenders in WA can live near schools

Our intent is to inform our citizens and to enhance community safety and awareness. The Metropolitan Police Department has not considered or assessed the specific risk of reoffense for any individual registrant included in the registry. In addition, it has made no determination that any offender included in the registry is currently dangerous. Offenders are included in the registry solely by virtue of their conviction record. Unlawful use of this information to threaten, intimidate, harass, or injure a registered sex offender will not be tolerated and will be prosecuted to the full extent of the law.

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For a complete listing of locations, click here. If you have read the above information on the purpose, limitations, and use of the registry, you may enter the Sex Offender Registry. Offenders are considered to have a high risk to re-offend.

They usually have one or more victims and may have committed prior crimes of violence. They may not know their victim s. The crime may show a manifest cruelty to the victim s and these offenders usually deny or minimize the crime. These offenders commonly have clear indications of a personality disorder.

Level I Sex Offenders

If the victim is a minor and not related to the offender then the offender is required to register for this offense. Skip to main content Sheriff. Online Reporting crime-reports.


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Sex offender registration information. Legal scholars have challenged the rationale behind the Supreme Court rulings. In , California became the first state in the United States to have a sex offender registration program. Prior to , only a few states required convicted sex offenders to register their addresses with local law enforcement. The s saw the emergence of several cases of brutal violent sexual offenses against children.

As a result, public policies began to focus on protecting public from stranger danger. Based on a report, prisoners convicted of rape or sexual assault who were released in were four times more likely to be arrested for a sex offense within 3 years of prison release than non-sexual offenders released within the same year.

Almost half of those imprisoned for child-victim cases, offended against their own child or other relative. Recidivism studies typically find that the older the prisoner when released, the lower the rate of recidivism.

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In one study of clinically diagnosed pedophiles "who targeted young boys outside the home committed the greatest number of crimes with an average of Under polygraph, many apprehended sex offenders indicated that most of their offenses were not reported. In , an year-old boy, Jacob Wetterling , was abducted from a street in St. Joseph, Minnesota. His whereabouts remained unknown for nearly 27 years until remains were discovered just outside Paynesville, Minnesota in Jacob's mother, Patty Wetterling , current chair of National Center for Missing and Exploited Children , led a community effort to implement a sex offender registration requirement in Minnesota and, subsequently, nationally.

States had a certain time period to enact the legislation, along with guidelines established by the Attorney General.

In an interview with reporter Madeleine Baran Wetterling stated, "No more victims, that's the goal. But we let our emotions run away from achieving that goal. You will not get a job you will not find housing. This is on your record forever, good luck. Jesse Timmenquas, who had been convicted of two previous sex crimes against children, lured Megan in his house and raped and killed her. Megan's mother, Maureen Kanka, started to lobby to change the laws, arguing that registration established by the Wetterling Act, was insufficient for community protection.

Maureen Kanka's goal was to mandate community notification, which under the Wetterling Act had been at the discretion of law enforcement. She said that if she had known that a sex offender lived across the street, Megan would still be alive.

Sex Offender Information

In , New Jersey enacted Megan's Law. The amendment required all states to implement Registration and Community Notification Laws by the end of Prior to Megan's death, only 5 states had laws requiring sex offenders to register their personal information with law enforcement.


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On August 5, Massachusetts was the last state to enact its version of Megan's Law. The most comprehensive legislation related to the supervision and management of sex offenders is the Adam Walsh Act AWA , named after Adam Walsh , who was kidnapped from a Florida shopping mall and killed in , when he was 6 years old. The AWA was signed on the 25th anniversary of his abduction; efforts to establish a national registry was led by John Walsh , Adam's father.

SORNA provides uniform minimum guidelines for registration of sex offenders, regardless of the state they live in.

Sex Offender Registry Websites

SORNA requires states to widen the number of covered offenses and to include certain classes of juvenile offenders. Prior to SORNA, states were granted latitude in the methods to differentiate offender management levels. Whereas many states had adopted to use structured risk assessment tools classification to distinguish "high risk" from "low risk" individuals, SORNA mandates such distinctions to be made solely on the basis of the governing offense.

Scholars have warned that classification system required under Adam Walsh Act is less sophisticated than risk-based approach previously adopted in certain states. Sex offenders must periodically report in person to their local law enforcement agency and furnish their address, and list of other information such as place of employment and email addresses. The offenders are photographed and fingerprinted by law enforcement, and in some cases DNA information is also collected. Registration period depends on the classification level and the law of the governing jurisdiction.

States apply varied methods of classifying registrants. Identical offenses committed in different states may produce different outcomes in terms of public disclosure and registration period. Sources of variation are diverse, but may be viewed over three dimensions — how classes of registrants are distinguished from one another, the criteria used in the classification process, and the processes applied in classification decisions. The first point of divergence is how states distinguish their registrants. At one end are the states operating single-tier systems that treat registrants equally with respect to reporting, registration duration, notification, and related factors.

Alternatively, some states use multi-tier systems, usually with two or three categories that are supposed to reflect presumed public safety risk and, in turn, required levels of attention from law enforcement and the public. Depending on state, registration and notification systems may have special provisions for juveniles, habitual offenders or those deemed " sexual predators " by virtue of certain standards. The second dimension is the criteria employed in the classification decision. States running offense-based systems use the conviction offense or the number of prior offenses as the criteria for tier assignment.

Other jurisdictions utilize various risk assessments that consider factors that scientific research has linked to sexual recidivism risk, such as age, number of prior sex offenses, victim gender, relationship to the victim, and indicators of psychopathy and deviant sexual arousal. Finally, some states use a hybrid of offense-based and risk-assessment-based systems for classification. For example, Colorado law requires minimum terms of registration based on the conviction offense for which the registrant was convicted or adjudicated but also uses a risk assessment for identifying sexually violent predators — a limited population deemed to be dangerous and subject to more extensive requirements.

Third, states distinguishing among registrants use differing systems and processes in establishing tier designations. In general, offense-based classification systems are used for their simplicity and uniformity. They allow classification decisions to be made via administrative or judicial processes. Risk-assessment-based systems, which employ actuarial risk assessment instruments and in some cases clinical assessments, require more of personnel involvement in the process.

Some states, like Massachusetts and Colorado, utilize multidisciplinary review boards or judicial discretion to establish registrant tiers or sexual predator status. In some states, such as Kentucky, Florida, and Illinois, all sex offenders who move into the state and are required to register in their previous home states are required to register for life, regardless of their registration period in previous residence. States apply differing sets of criteria to determine which registration information is available to the public.

In a few states, a judge determines the risk level of the offender, or scientific risk assessment tools are used; information on low-risk offenders may be available to law enforcement only. In other states, all sex offenders are treated equally, and all registration information is available to the public on a state Internet site. Information of juvenile offenders are withheld for law enforcement but may be made public after their 18th birthday.

Under federal SORNA , only tier I registrants may be excluded from public disclosure, with exemption of those convicted of "specified offense against a minor. Disparities in state legislation have caused some registrants moving across state lines becoming subject to public disclosure and longer registration periods under the destination state's laws. Laws restricting where registered sex offenders may live or work have become increasingly common since In addition, hundreds of counties and municipalities have passed local ordinances exceeding the state requirements, [31] [32] and some local communities have created exclusion zones around churches , pet stores , movie theaters , libraries , playgrounds , tourist attractions or other "recreational facilities" such as stadiums , airports , auditoriums , swimming pools , skating rinks and gymnasiums, regardless of whether publicly or privately owned.